Fit is Everything - Infinitely Adjustable for Optimal Comfort & Performance!

Tip 7: Saddle Straightness

Ask yourself…
Do you often have to step into one stirrup while riding in order to center your saddle on your horse’s back?

If you answered “yes” to the above question, you may be faced with a Saddle Straightness issue. Watch this informative video for some saddle fit tips on “Saddle Straightness” !

Understanding the Importance of Saddle Straightness

One of the things we see often – even in professional pictures in various magazines – is that the rider is not actually sitting straight on the horse (this is especially obvious when you see the rider from behind!).

Once you have determined that your saddle has adequate wither clearance, a gullet/ channel that is the appropriate width for your horse, properly aligned billets, and is the correct length for your horse, you need to make sure that it sits straight on your horse’s back. Straightness means that the center of the saddle is in alignment with your horse’s spine. Sometimes, a saddle that appears straight when the horse is standing in the crossties will shift to the right or left when the horse is being ridden. A saddle that falls or twists to one side can lead to problems with your horse’s SI (sacroiliac) joint; if the saddle shifts to such a degree that the panels rest on the horse’s spine, this can lead to the kind of irreversible long-term damage we discussed in Saddle Fit Tip # 3 – Gullet/Channel Width.

The best way to determine if your saddle falls or twists to one side while your horse is being ridden is to do a dust pattern ride and analysis. Without brushing your horse’s back, tack him up and ride him on a 20-meter circle in each direction at the walk, trot, and canter. Then, carefully lift the saddle off of his back, so as to not disturb the telltale outline left by the saddle’s panels. Put your horse in crossties if available; if not, have a friend hold your horse on even ground. Square up your horse. Put a mounting block or something on which you can safely stand behind your horse; the goal is to have a clear view of the top of his back. Stand on the mounting block and look at the dust pattern. Did your saddle sit nice and straight on your horse’s back? Or did it fall to the right or to the left? If you are uncertain, take a tape measure and measure the distance from the center of your horse’s spine to the outside of the rear panel on each side. If the saddle falls to the right, which is most common, the measurement from the center of your horse’s spine to the outside of the right-hand panel will be bigger than the measurement from the center of his spine to the outside of the left-hand panel.

fitTip7

 

The above pictures help demonstrate two ways in which Jochen Schleese will check for Saddle Straightness

What causes a saddle to fall to one side of a horse’s back? Horses are by nature uneven. The overwhelming majority of horses are not built symmetrically through their shoulders. 70% of horses have a left shoulder that is larger and more developed than their right shoulder; 20% have a right shoulder that is larger and more developed than their left shoulder; and 10% are even through the shoulders. Whether a horse is left- or right-side dominant can result from several things: the way it was positioned in utero, which leg is forward when the horse grazes, and/ or the way the horse has been trained. Sometimes a saddle falls to one side because the gullet/channel is too narrow and/or the tree width or tree angle (to be discussed in Saddle Tips #8 and #9) is not correctly adjusted for the horse. So the larger shoulder kicks the saddle over to the other side.

Alternatively, a rider who sits unevenly can compress the stuffing more on one side of the saddle, and drag it over to that side. Perhaps the rider has an imbalance such as is caused by scoliosis, or one hip is lower than the other, or s/he weights one stirrup more than the other. If you have determined that your saddle does not sit straight on your horse’s back, it is important to determine the cause and resolve the issue in order to avoid causing long-term damage to your horse.

 

Is this a challenge you are facing? Are you experiencing other saddle fit issues? Tell us about them and let us help!

Contact miriam@schleese.com or solutions@schleese.com, book a Personal Saddle Fit Evaluation, or attend an educational lecture/demo.

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Testimonials

I just wanted to thank you for the recent article you wrote on saddle fit and hyper-flexion. In fact, I want to thank you for ALL the publications and electronic clips you have created.  Your dedication to improving the welfare of horses through education is inspiring and a principle we try to live by here. We work hard every day to make sure our horses are healthy and happy and that their needs as horses are always met, before ever considering what we need from them. I am always eager to devour your articles and webinars because of the emphasis on the horse as a living being whose physical structures have specific functions, and how to tailor our own desires/wants to work WITH these structures instead of against them. When I first learned principles of saddle fitting, I learned only about the line of the panel following the horse’s back to ensure there was full contact and no bridging, about 2-3 fingers of space between top of wither and bottom of pommel, and the classic idea (at the time) that the pommel and cantle should sit level if the saddle was in balance on the horse’s back.  Thinking back on that makes me sad that I may have made horses uncomfortable because of what I didn’t know… Through my own education endeavors, and with a strong assist from your seminars, I now understand about the saddle support area, not having a saddle riding the scapula (or causing it to jam against it with every step), not having a saddle too far back, and the importance of aligning the seat of the saddle with the optimal carrying spot at the base of the horse’s withers.  I understand that a saddle can ‘fit’ but the horse may not like the feel of it, and to look first at fit and comfort when a horse starts developing ‘attitude’. I’ve learned that a saddle can ‘fit’ in the barn but you have to confirm the fit with a person in the tack- because weight in the saddle changes things. Given we are all animal lovers, we want what’s best for the horses, even if that means they need a different job in order to be happy.  We are proud that our herd looks healthy and happy and that not one horse is ring sour. Reading your recent article, I was struck with a need to express my gratitude for the horse person you have helped me to become.  I wanted you to know about the profound impact your words and philosophy has had, not just on me, but the horses, clients and trainers I have worked with, numbering collectively in the hundreds. Thank you again, I look forward to future articles.  

— Seana Waldon - Ontario

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